MBRC Planning Scheme - Reconfiguring a lot

In accordance with the Planning Act 2016, reconfiguring a lot includes:

  • creating lots by subdividing another lot;
  • amalgamating two or more lots;
  • rearranging boundaries of a lot by registering a plan of subdivision;
  • dividing land into parts to allow exclusive access or use (e.g. subdivision by lease or community title scheme); and
  • creating an easement giving access to a lot from a constructed road.

Reconfiguring a lot is commonly known as subdivision. The planning scheme contains the requirements for reconfiguring a lot.

Do I need council approval?

Reconfiguring a lot is generally assessable development. This means in order to undertake a reconfiguration, development approval is required from council.

Section 5.6 Categories of development and assessment - Reconfiguring a lot identifies the categories of development and assessment or type of application required for reconfiguring a lot in each of the zones. This section also identifies the assessment benchmarks (requirements) that an application will be assessed against.

Most requirements are contained in the Reconfiguring a lot code, which is found in Section 9.4.1 of the planning scheme. The code is divided into 12 sections, one for each zone.

Refer to the reconfiguring a lot tables in Section 5.9 for categories of development and assessment where in a local plan area.

Proposals for amalgamating lots do not require council approval. A surveyor can prepare a plan for lodgement directly with the Queensland Titles Registry.

How many lots can I create?

The number of lots a property may be subdivided into depends on a range of factors.

The primary requirements that determine the number of lots are found at the beginning of the criteria for assessable development for the relevant section of the Reconfiguring a lot code under the headings Lot size and design, Site Density and/or Lot design, mix and location. Other requirements throughout the code will also influence the number of lots that may be created, especially the mix of lots types and sizes proposed and Values and constraints criteria.

The planning scheme specifies minimum required lot sizes and frontages in some zones, precincts and local plans. Where no minimum lot size or frontage is identified, the planning scheme either does not prescribe minimum areas or dimensions, or the density of the development is used to determine the number of lots potentially created.

Requirements relating to proposed lot dimensions, built to boundary wall, mix of lot sizes and diversity in the streetscape are used to ensure an appropriate design and number of lots is achieved and appropriate housing options are provided in the location.

The densities and lot sizes in the tables below are only one aspect to consider when subdividing land. You can find further information in the Reconfiguring a lot code in Section 9.4.1 or the applicable local plan code.

Planning Scheme Policy - Neighbourhood design(PDF, 5MB) in schedule 6 provides assistance for applying the density provision of the planning scheme and designing a development layout in accordance with the planning scheme requirements.

Minimum and maximum density

The following table summarises the zones, precincts and local plans where the planning scheme uses a measure of density for reconfiguring a lot.

General residential zone

Precinct Minimum net residential density Maximum net residential density
Next generation neighbourhood precinct 11 lots per hectare 25 lots per hectare
Urban neighbourhood precinct - certain areas near Redcliffe Peninsula Line stations No lot density prescribed, but ultimate development must achieve a minimum of 75 dwellings per hectare Not specified
Urban neighbourhood precinct - all other areas No lot density prescribed, but ultimate development must achieve a minimum of 45 dwellings per hectare Not specified

Emerging Community zone

Precinct Minimum net residential density Maximum net residential density
Transition precinct (where on a developed lot or creating developed lots) 11 lots per hectare 25 lots per hectare
Transition precinct - Morayfield South urban area identified on Figure 9.4.1.3.2.1 Morayfield South urban area 45 lots per hectare Not specified

Township zone

Precinct Minimum net residential density Maximum net residential density
Township residential precinct NA 11 lots per hectare

Caboolture West local plan

Precinct Minimum net residential density Maximum net residential density
Urban living precinct (where on a developed lot or creating developed lots) 11 lots per hectare (in accordance with the Neighbourhood Development Plan) 30 lots per hectare (in accordance with the Neighbourhood Development Plan)

Minimum lot sizes

The following table summarises the zones, precincts and local plans where the planning scheme identifies minimum lot size and frontage requirements for new lots being created. In some instances, the planning scheme may also identify a maximum density for development (lots per hectare).

Centre zone

Precinct Minimum lot size * Minimum frontage *
Higher order centres (Caboolture centre, Morayfield centre, Strathpine centre and Petrie mill precincts) 1,000m2 40m
District centre precinct 1,000m2 20m
Local centre precinct Not specified Not specified

General residential zone

Precinct Minimum lot size * Minimum frontage *
Coastal communities precinct 600m2
(maximum density 11 lots per hectare)
12.5m
Suburban neighbourhood precinct 600m2
(maximum density 11 lots per hectare)
12.5m
Next generation neighbourhood precinct Not specified - Refer to the minimum net residential density above Not specified
Urban neighbourhood precinct Not specified - Refer to the minimum net residential density above Not specified

Industry zone

Precinct Minimum lot size * Minimum frontage *
Mixed industry business precinct 1,000m2 Minimum width to depth ration of 1:2 or 2:1
Light industry precinct 2,500m2 Minimum width to depth ration of 1:2 or 2:1
General industry precinct 4,000m2 Minimum width to depth ration of 1:2 or 2:1
Restricted industry precinct 6,000m2 Minimum width to depth ration of 1:2 or 2:1
Marine industry precinct 4,000m2 Minimum width to depth ration of 1:2 or 2:1

Rural zone

Zone Minimum lot size * Minimum frontage *
Rural zone 100ha (refer to Reconfiguring a lot code - Rural zone for exceptions) 100m

Rural residential zone

Zone Minimum lot size * Minimum frontage *
Rural residential zone Refer to Overlay map - Rural residential lot sizes **
4 categories of minimum lot sizes apply:
  • 2ha
  • 6,000m2
  • 3,000m2
  • No further reconfiguration
Not specified

Township zone

Precinct Minimum lot size * Minimum frontage *
Township industry precinct 2,500m2 Minimum width to depth ratio of 1:2 or 2:1

Caboolture West local plan

Precinct Minimum lot size * Minimum frontage *
Town centre precinct In accordance with the Neighbourhood Development Plan In accordance with the Neighbourhood Development Plan
Enterprise and employment precinct 1,000m2 40m
Rural living precinct 6,000m2, with an average of 8,000m2 Not specified

Redcliffe Kippa-Ring local plan

Precinct Minimum lot size * Minimum frontage *
Redcliffe seaside village precinct 1,000m2 40m
Kippa-Ring village precinct 1,000m2 40m
Local services precinct 1,000m2 20m
Health precinct 1,000m2 20m

* The minimum lot sizes and frontages listed above are mostly examples (E's). If a reconfiguration proposes alternative lot sizes and frontages, the applicant will need to demonstrate compliance with the corresponding performance outcomes (PO's).

** Use My property look up to find out if your property is identified on Overlay map - Rural residential lot sizes. This map can also be viewed via the Interactive map or in PDF format(PDF, 33MB).

The densities, lot sizes and frontages above are a summary of the requirements and should be used as a preliminary guide only. The final number of lots a property may be subdivided into may vary once all relevant requirements in the applicable codes and planning scheme policies are complied with.

When is subdivision not supported?

The planning scheme does not support the subdivision of land in the following zones, precincts and local plans:

  • Limited development zone
  • Emerging community zone - Interim precinct
  • Emerging community zone - Transition precinct (creating developable lots)
  • Caboolture West local plan where no Neighbourhood development plan is approved by Council and included in the Local plan
  • Redcliffe Kippa-Ring Local Plan Interim residential precinct

Where a property is already at the minimum lot size or density, the further subdivision of the property may not be supported.

If your property is identified on the Coastal hazard or Flood hazard overlay maps and located within the Erosion prone area or a high or medium risk area, additional requirements will apply which may restrict the ability to subdivide the property. Use My property look up to find out if your property is identified on these overlay maps.

Influence of the South East Queensland Regional Plan

The South East Queensland Regional Plan 2009-2031 (SEQ Regional Plan) is the Queensland Government’s broad land use plan to manage growth and protect the region’s lifestyle and environment. The SEQ Regional Plan allocates all land into one of three regional land use categories: Regional Landscape and Rural Production Area, Urban Footprint or Rural Living Area.

Regional Landscape and Rural Production Areas have environmental, conservation, rural production and other non-urban values. The SEQ Regional Plan protects these lands from encroachment by inappropriate development, particularly urban and rural residential development. Most land in the Regional Landscape and Rural Production Areas is included in the Rural zone in the MBRC Planning Scheme.

Any proposal to subdivide land in the Regional Landscape and Rural Production Area into lots less than 100 hectares is prohibited unless the allotment is affected by a road severance. There are some exemptions for boundary re-alignments and lot amalgamations.

More information

To further understand the reconfiguring a lot requirements, contact Council or an appropriately qualified professional. While Council aims to assist you through the process, you may wish to engage a consultant, town planner or surveyor for help with your development project.