Keeping of animals

1. Overview

Council's Local Law 2 Animal management and Subordinate Local Law define minimum standards for the keeping and control of animals.

If you own or keep stock you must comply with the requirements of the Biosecurity Act 2014 including identification and movement records.

The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries has defined codes of practice to give members of the public additional standards that are required for the keeping of certain species:

  • poultry
  • pigs or miniature pigs
  • cattle (e.g. cows, steers, bulls, stallions)
  • sheep or goats
  • bees.

2. Keeping of cats and dogs

The Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008 and Moreton Bay Regional Council Local Law No. 2 (Animal Management) 2011 regulate the requirements for dogs and cats to be registered.

Dogs are prohibited from particular properties located in Desmond Street, Samuel Way or Steven Court, Narangba in order to minimise impacts upon koala habitat.

The registration and renewal period for cat and dog registrations starts 1 October and expires 30 September annually. Council issues a renewal notice in early September for each registered animal with payments due by 30 September.

See cat and dog registration fees for all registration related costs.

The number of cats and dogs on a property is regulated by Council's local law and is dependent on the size of the property.

Council has set minimum standards for the keeping and control of animals.

3. Keeping of stock (cattle, sheep, goats, pigs)

If you own or keep cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, deer, alpacas, llamas, horses, ponies, donkeys you must comply with the requirements of the Biosecurity Act 2014 including identification and movement records.

You must be registered as a biosecurity entity and you will be allocated a property identification code (PIC) that is associated with the land where you keep your animal(s).

National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) accredited devices for cattle must be an electronic (RFID) device. This can be either a single ear tag, or a rumen bolus/visual ear tag combination.

National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) accredited devices for sheep and goats can be either an electronic (RFID) device or a visual (non-electronic) tag. Sheep and goats can only be identified by ear tags/devices.

The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries has defined codes of practice to give members of the public additional standards that are required for the keeping of stock.

4. Keeping of designated birds (poultry/birds)

If you own or keep 100 or more designated birds you must comply with the requirements of the Biosecurity Act 2014 including identification and movement records.

Designated birds are defined as birds that are raised for human consumption (e.g. poultry) or, raised for the production of eggs for human consumption (e.g. poultry) or, have been released into free flight since they started being kept in captivity (e.g. pigeons).

Before moving designated birds within Queensland you must become a registered biosecurity entity (RBE) to be allocated a property identification code (PIC).

The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries has defined codes of practice to give members of the public additional standards that are required for the keeping of poultry.

5. Keeping of bees (excluding native bees)

If you own or keep one or more beehive you must comply with the requirements of the Biosecurity Act 2014 including identification and movement records.

You must be registered as a biosecurity entity and you'll receive a unique Hive identification numbers (HIN) to brand your hive

The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries has defined codes of practice to give members of the public additional standards that are required for beekeeping.

6. Minimum standards for the keeping of animals

Council's Local Law 2 Animal management and Subordinate Local Law define minimum standards for the keeping and control of animals. Some of these are reproduced below:

Animal enclosures

  • Enclosures built specifically for the keeping of animals are to be maintained to an acceptable structural condition to ensure that the animals cannot escape; and
  • Uneaten food scraps, manure and any other material likely to become offensive (i.e. faeces, soiled bedding, litter) and create a nuisance must be collected at least daily and if not immediately removed from the premises, must be kept in a suitable vermin proof container prior to disposal; and
  • Vermin and pests including fleas, flies, ticks, lice, and rodents, must be controlled in and around the enclosure; and
  • Run off from animal enclosure(s) must not be allowed to discharge to any adjoining property.

Animal identification

  • Dogs and cats must wear the tag supplied by the local government.
  • National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) accredited devices for cattle must be an electronic Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID). This can be either a single ear tag, or a rumen bolus/visual ear tag combination.
  • National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) accredited devices for sheep and goats can be either an electronic Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) device or a visual (non-electronic) tag. Sheep and goats can only be identified by ear tags/devices.
  • Birds excluding poultry must have an identifying leg band or be micro-chipped.

Minimum distance from boundary

  • Roofed or fully enclosed (caged) structure for the housing of animals must be a minimum 1.5 metres from any property boundary.

Pick up after your pet

  • It is your responsibility to clean up and dispose of your animal's waste in a sanitary way. Fines may apply.
  • Animal waste (faeces) must not be left in parks, gardens, beaches, footpaths or streets 

Biting and aggression

  • All animal owners are responsible and legally liable for the actions of their animals.
  • Animals may be declared dangerous or menacing for displaying aggressive behaviour causing fear, attacking a person or another animal or damaging property.

See dangerous, menacing and restricted dogs for more information.

Additional standards

Additional standards for ratites, e.g. ostrich, emu, racing pigeons and bees are found within the minimum standards found in Local Law 2 - Animal Management subordinate local law.

Species or breed of animal Minimum standards for keeping particular animals 
Racing pigeons Racing pigeons must be confined to their home loft after their designated race or exercise period. 
Ratites (ostrich, emu, and other similar birds)

A person must not on any premises keep ratites in densities greater than:

(i) Chicks 0 to 12 weeks of age - a shed density of not more than 3 chicks per square metre with an additional outside run of 5 square metres per chick; or

(ii) Juveniles 12 weeks to 6 months of age - a maximum density of not more than two per square metre with an additional outside run of 40 square metre per chick; or

(iii) Yearlings 6 months to 18 months of age - a maximum density of not more than 100 per hectare; or

(iv) Mature ratites over 18 months of age - a maximum density of not more than 18 per hectare.