MBRC Planning Scheme - Dual occupancy

The state government defines Dual occupancy as a premise containing two dwellings on one lot (whether or not attached) for separate households. 

Dual occupancies can establish in a number of different forms:

  1. A traditional Dual occupancy comprises a single or two storey dwelling that is attached to the other dwelling by a common wall, but it may be detached. The dwellings may share a driveway but generally all other facilities are separate. The Dual occupancy does not include a primary and subordinate dwelling.
  2. A less traditional Dual occupancy incorporates a loft dwelling. These Dual occupancies consist of a single or two storey dwelling, being the primary dwelling that is attached to another smaller dwelling. The dwellings may share a driveway but generally all other facilities are separate. For more information on this type of Dual occupancy refer to Planning Scheme policy - Residential design(PDF, 21MB).

It is important to note, if it is proposed to sell each dwelling independently, further development approval is required to create individual land titles (Reconfiguring a lot).

More than two dwellings on a property is defined as a Multiple dwelling (see Multiple dwelling information sheet).

Dual occupancies are not appropriate in all residential zones and precincts. They are supported in the General residential zone - Next generation precinct to allow for overall increase residential density. However, Dual occupancies are not suitable in a General residential zone - Urban precinct as the residential density associated with this form of development is too low. Dual occupancies are not appropriate in the Rural or Rural residential zones.

Do I need Council approval?

The following table summarises the category of development and assessment (type of application needed, if any) and relevant assessment benchmarks (requirements) for Dual occupancies.

Development that is categorised as ‘Accepted development subject to requirements’ does not require development approval from Council provided it complies with the relevant assessment benchmarks outlined in the planning scheme. If the proposal does not comply with the relevant assessment benchmarks, a development application must be lodged with Council for approval. Assessable development (Code assessment and impact assessment) requires approval from Council.

Zone Precinct Category of development Assessment benchmarks
Centre zone    Assessable - Code assessment if in a mixed use building; and in the Caboolture, Strathpine or district centre precinct.
  • Centre zone code (relevant precinct only)
  • Residential uses code
Centre zone Petrie mill precinct Accepted development subject to requirements if not accepted development; located on Council owned or controlled land; and in accordance with a Council Master Plan approved under Council policy
  • The Council Master Plan
Emerging community zone Transition precinct
(on a developed lot)
Accepted development subject to requirements if on a lot with a road frontage of 25m or more and complying with the relevant requirements for accepted development

General residential zone

Coastal communities precinct and Suburban Assessable - Code assessment if on a lot with an area of 1,000m2 or more

General residential zone

Next generation neighbourhood precinct Accepted development subject to requirements if on a lot with a road frontage of 25m or more and complying with the relevant requirements for accepted development
Township zone Centre precinct Assessable - Code assessment if on a lot with a non-residential use.
  • Township zone code (relevant precinct only)
  • Residential uses code
 

Township zone

Residential precinct Assessable - Code assessment if on a lot with an area greater than 1,000m2 or more and a primary frontage of 30m or more; meets the requirement for building height; and within 800m of the Township zone - Centre precinct.
All other Zones and Precincts  Assessable - Impact assessment Dual occupancies in other Zones will be assessed against the entire planning scheme. 

A Dual occupancy is not a Secondary dwelling. A Secondary dwelling is part of a Dwelling house. A secondary dwelling is a dwelling used in conjunction with, and subordinate to, a Dwelling house on the same lot. It may be free standing or constructed under or attached to a Dwelling house. For more information, see Secondary dwelling information sheet.

To find out if development requires an application and the category of development and assessment, refer to Part 5 Tables of assessment in the planning scheme. Assessment benchmarks (requirements) for a Dual occupancy are contained in the relevant zone code in Part 6 (links provided above) and the Residential uses code (section 9.3.2 part A only). Planning Scheme policy - Residential design(PDF, 21MB) provides additional information and guidance about satisfying assessment benchmarks identified in the planning scheme.